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Review: GLOW – Netflix Original

A comic take on the beginnings of televised women’s wrestling, GLOW, is a wild new Netflix original series, based on an equally wild true story.

Set in the 1980s, GLOW details the formation of a female wrestling competition, G.L.O.W. – Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling. The series was inspired by the 2012 documentary about the real 80s women’s wrestling TV show. With a strong, female-dominated cast, the series brings back the 80’s with aerobics leotards, corkscrew curls and a soundtrack full of forgotten hits.

Detailing the story of a young, rich producer’s dream-come-to-life, the series opens with the auditioning and training of ‘unusual’, aspiring actresses who learn to portray the theatric wrestler roles of G.L.O.W. In a drawn out manner, the series explores character interactions as the Gorgeous Ladies try to transform dramatic acting skills into a likely image of aggression. While the Netflix original is slow to start, the latter half of the series picks up as it fully utilises the cast, falling into a steady rhythm.

In a similar style to the earlier seasons of Netflix’s Orange is the New Black, the dramatic comedy uses a diverse cast to cram weeks of happenings into 10 short, half-hour episodes. Although this certainly makes up in part of the slow start, it does leave complex characters somewhat underdeveloped, with rather shallow attempts at exploring what could have been extremely riveting and engaging backstories. Where the further characterization of the series’ personas could have bettered GLOW overall, there is no doubt that the talented cast is a key asset to the series that makes it worth the watch.

 

6/10 – hard to describe and initially hard to watch, but not a bad binge. 

 

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About Cheryl Till

Cheryl loves not knowing what to do, including what to write for this bio. She occupies her time with different hobbies, although she isn't entirely sure if reading and watching Netflix for hours on end as a form of procrastination count as hobbies. You can probably find Cheryl in a comfy chair somewhere, pretending to be productive.

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